News

The Supreme Court is Trying Out Videoconferencing for Trials

Two cases will be used for the pilot testing of this new method.
IMAGE Pexels.com
Comments

Looks like the future beckons, but whether we're taking a step forwards or backwards is up to you: the Supreme Court will be conducting a two-year pilot test of hearing court cases via videoconferencing. Testing period started on September 2 at the Davao City Regional Trial Court, and will be done for two cases: one involves alleged members of the New People's Army who attempted to ambush security personnel in 2014, and another is the case of a man accused of frustrated murder in 2013.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

The Supreme Court (SC) aims to use videoconferencing to reduce, "the serious risks to the safety, security, lives and health of not only the accused and those charged with transporting them between the jail and court, but of judges, court officers and personnel, and the general public as well," according to a report by the Philippine Star. Ideally, it could also reduce transport and security costs, plus speed up the process.

The accused will remain at the Davao City District Jail while their cases are heard at the Davao City Regional Trial Court (RTC) before Executive Judge Emmanuel Carpio. CCTV monitors, speakers, and high-definition cameras have been placed in both the courtoom and a designated room in the district jail, connected through radio towers, for the video conference trials.

During the testing period, the SC will hold video conference trials for inmates who are are "high-value targets" (read: suspected members of terrorist groups, already convicted of other crimes) or have been diagnosed with highly-contagious diseases. Other inmates may also volunteer to join the pilot test.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

If the testing proves to be successful, our justice system may turn to video conference trials on a nationwide scale. "It can later on be applied in civil cases and benefit our thousands of overseas foreign workers in foreign countries who need not go back home to physically testify in our courts but instead appear remotely from our embassies and consulates," added Supreme Court Associate Justice Diosdado Peralta, who led the project, in a report by the Inquirer.net.

This story originally appeared on Spot.phMinor edits have been made by the Esquiremag.ph editors.

Comments
View More Articles About:
Recommended Videos
About The Author
Mia Rodriguez for Spot.ph
View Other Articles From Mia
Comments
Latest Feed
 
Share
The collection is available in the Uniqlo Manila Flagship and SM Megamall.
 
Share
White-on-white-on-black? That's something of a holy trinity.
 
Share
The famous DJ on his favorite sneakers, wardrobe essentials, and dressing for events.
 
Share
The Super Bowl, not the Olympics, is now the most valuable sporting event.
 
Share
Not all water bottles are created equal.
 
Share
Doctor Manhattan, Laurie Juspeczyk, Daniel Dreiberg, and Adrian Veidt aren't gone forever.
 
Share
 
Share
The drop in temperature requires this standard piece.
 
Share
The founders of Monsieur Waffles want the world to relearn things about the Philippines.
 
Share
While shooting the November cover story, Esquire threw every updo they could think of at him. Turns out he's fully got it down.
 
Share
With the LG customization tour, the brand highlights that as well as Rene Lacoste and his roots with tennis and creativity.
Load More Articles
Connect With Us